Take Action Today to End Demand

Contact your DC Council Member and let them know that you support ending demand in DC.

DC Stop Modern Slavery has introduced the End Demand law to DC City Council and now we need YOU to let them know that DC residents want to put an End to Demand.

The End Demand campaign seeks to strengthen consequence for the buyers of sex with minors in Washington, DC:

  • Distinguish between consequences for purchasing sex with an adult versus sex with a minor;
  • Eliminate the “mistake of age” defense so that buyers/renters of youths’ bodies cannot get away with saying that they thought the minors were over the age of 18;
  • People convicted under the new subsection shall be required to register as sex offenders – this goes for the traffickers as well as those who are the renters/buyers.  They will also face longer jail time and much larger fines.

Join us as we put an End to Demand and the sexual exploitation of DC’s youth!

YOU can make an impact- Let Congress Hear Your Voice

 

Stop modern slavery and human trafficking today- ask your friends and family to do the same!

Right now, Congress has a reputation for not doing much but they’re staying busy with human trafficking. The House of Representatives will be voting on a bill and the Senate is voting on five bills that positively impact victims of trafficking and try to hinder the efforts of exploiters and traffickers.

It is critical that your representatives and senators hear your voice now on these bills.

We need your help!

How you can help:

1. Call your representatives and ask them to VOTE YES on H.R. 2283the Human Trafficking Prioritization Act

2. We’ve made it easy- Contact your senators with this quick form from Shared Hope International and ask them to VOTE YES on the 5 for Freedom!

Reach out to your neighbors, family and friends and ask them to contact their U.S. Representatives and Senators today.

The more noise we can make together, the closer we can be to ending human trafficking

and sex slavery.

 

Nefarious: Merchant of Souls – Film Viewing

As National Slavery and Human Trafficking Month (January, initiated by President Obama in December 2011) came to a close, DC-SMS and CapCity College at George Washington University teamed up for a film viewing of the documentary Nefarious: Merchant of Souls.

I was drawn in by the humility of the filmmakers; their purpose was to learn about a topic in which they were not experts, rather to present or lecture. Through interviews, the documentary provided an impressive interweaving of perspectives – survivors, families, ex-traffickers, journalists and researchers, psychologists, and activists, to name a few. Bit by bit, we followed the team as they began to unravel the mystery of modern slavery.

They began in Moldova, a smaller Eastern European country located between Ukraine and Romania, often considered to be the epicenter of human trafficking. The team then moved on to the red light district of Amsterdam, where prostitution is legal; but as they discover, legality is sometimes hard to recognize through a store window. The film switched gears for a bit to southeast Asia, specifically in Thailand and Cambodia, where they learned more about family-fueled human trafficking situations. Nefarious brought it home to Las Vegas, U.S.A., for the next section, emphasizing important similarities and distinctions between human trafficking in the United States versus other countries they had explored. To wrap it up, the film briefly highlighted Sweden, where the purchase of prostitution was criminalized in 1999.

Here are a few points, statistics, or anecdotes that struck me while watching Nefarious:

  • Human trafficking is the fastest growing criminal industry. It is profitable second only to drugs.
  • Wherever the filmmakers went, they encountered girls trafficked from Eastern Europe.
  • In Amsterdam, 60% of prostituted women report being physically assaulted.
  • Industries need two things to survive: money and government (or some form of authoritative) support. Where human trafficking thrives, it has both.
  • In regards to human trafficking, is poverty certainly a correlation but not necessarily causation.
  • In the United States, it was more common for women to admit they were lured by the glamour and prosperity of prostitution, and then later trapped in a trafficking spiral.
  • The average age of entry into sex trafficking in the United States is 12-14 years old.
  • The woman who sat next to me spoke with me briefly following the film and she shared that what surprised her the most was the statistics on parental complicity, particularly in Cambodia, where 80-90% of families sell their daughters as a source of income.

The film ended with a few William Wilberforce quotes that clearly meant a great deal to the filmmakers and the documentary’s message:

“If to be feelingly alive to the sufferings of my fellow-creatures is to be a fanatic, I am one of the most incurable fanatics ever permitted to be at large.”

“You may choose to look the other way, but you can never again say you did not know.”

 

Overall, this was a successful event for both DC Stop Modern Slavery and CapCity. We had to find more chairs so people could sit down!

 

Global Centurion Hosting Walk Sign-Up Happy Hour

Global Centurion is hosting an event at the Mad Hatter on 1319 Connecticut Ave NW on Wednesday, October 20th from 6 to 9 PM to promote additional sign-ups for the DC Stop Modern Slavery Walk on October 23rd! One free drink will be given for those who have not yet signed up, and the entire upstairs area has been reserved for all attendees. Hope to see you all there!